Home | Daily Specials | Lunch Menu | All You Can Eat Lunch | Dinner Menu | All You Can Eat Dinner | Drink Menu

ALL YOU CAN EAT SUSHI

Lunch $11.99
Dinner $21.99 (kids 13 or under $13.99)
Sunday $21.99 All day.





The History of Hibachi

It is not known when the hibachi was first used in Japan, however written records suggest that it was used by the Heian period (798-1185 AD). Owing to the low availability of metal in Japan, early hibachis were made from dug-out cypress wood lined with clay. However, craftsmen soon began to make more decorative versions with lacquered finishes, gold leaf, and other artistic embellishments.

Stronger materials such as metal and ceramics became popular over time. Traditional hibachis can be very attractive objects in themselves and are today sometimes sold as antiques. They were originally used mainly by the samurai classes and aristocrats but gradually spread among ordinary people. Their design developed throughout the Edo period.

For most of its history the hibachi was used for heating, but it has been put to many uses; for example, as a cigarette lighter and portable stove for Japanese troops during World War II.

The hibachi was once a common sight in Japan before the Second World War, and was often seen in waiting rooms at train stations, but it became a rarity and was gradually replaced by the oil heaters now commonplace in Japan. Central heating is relatively rare in Japanese homes.




Everybody Loves Teriyaki!

Teriyaki (kanji: 照り焼き; hiragana: てりやき) is a cooking technique used in Japanese cuisine in which foods are broiled or grilled in a sweet soy sauce marinade (tare in Japanese). Teriyaki is served in most modern Japanese cuisines.

Fish – yellowtail, marlin, skipjack tuna, salmon, trout, and mackerel – is mainly used in Japan, while meat – chicken, pork, lamb and beef – is more often used in the West. Other ingredients sometimes used in Japan include squid, hamburger steak and meatball.

The word teriyaki derives from the noun teri (照り?), which refers to a shine or luster given by the sugar content in the tare, and yaki (焼き?), which refers to the cooking method of grilling or broiling. Traditionally the meat is dipped in or brushed with sauce several times before and during cooking.[1]

The tare is traditionally made by mixing and heating soy sauce, sake or mirin, and sugar or honey. The sauce is boiled and reduced to the desired thickness, then used to marinate meat which is then grilled or broiled. Sometimes ginger is added, and the final dish may be garnished with green onions.

Teriyaki can also be served cold, as it often is in bento menus.



Business Hours

Monday - Thursday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM / 4:00 PM - 10:00PM

Friday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM / 4:00 PM - 11:00 PM

Saturday 11:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Sunday 11:00 AM - 9:30 PM